fightingforanimals:

Pouring coke cola on raw meat (mostly pork, not sure about other kinds?) causes hidden maggots to surface. Obviously cooking properly would kill them anyway, but it’s pretty vile to imagine crunching and chewing your way through dead larvae.

(In case you’re wondering why there are maggots - meat is flesh, and flesh begins to rot as soon as the body is dead/the flesh is removed. So naturally, flies will want to lay eggs in it. Meat inspectors won’t catch everything - for example there are numerous reports of fish containing live or dead worms. It’s just one of those things if you eat rotting foods).

scienceyoucanlove:

Reforestation

What is reforestation?

Reforestation involves the replanting or regeneration of areas of forest which have previously been damaged or destroyed. Sometimes forests are able to regenerate naturally if sufficient trees remain nearby and seeds can be dispersed into the deforested areas via animals or wind. However, areas of forest which have been severely degraded are unlikely to be able to regenerate naturally and need to be replanted by hand using native tree species.

Why is reforestation needed?

Reforestation is needed because huge areas of forest are being damaged or destroyed around the world on a daily basis. Some estimates suggest that an area of forest equivalent in size to 36 football pitches is lost every minute. This deforestation has a number of causes, including fires, the clearing of land to make way for agriculture or human settlement, logging, mining and climate change.

Forests are very important for a number of reasons and deforestation is a serious problem which affects us all. As well as being home to a huge and diverse range of animal and plant species, forests provide livelihoods for a vast number of people around the world and are a source of paper, timber, food and the ingredients of many other products, such as medicines and cosmetics. Forests are also vital for the health of our planet, maintaining the water cycle, preventing soil erosion and absorbing and storing enormous amounts of carbon dioxide which helps to limit the effects of climate change.

In order to tackle deforestation there are a number of organisations around the world that aim to replant trees and help to regenerate and restore forest habitats.

Reforestation facts

  • Reforestation usually involves replanting areas of forest which have previously been damaged or destroyed, using native tree species.
  • Reforestation is of great importance, as estimates suggest that at the current rate of deforestation, there may be no rainforest left within 100 years.
  • Huge areas of forest have already been lost, for example, only around eight percent of the Atlantic forest in South America now remains.

read more from ARKive 

ramandjafari:

Sketchwizzlecon Sketch Wizzles No.2

Heeyoo errrbody,
I’m back from the SketchWizzleCon 2014 in Wuppertal. Those last four days have been an absolute blast! A great location, good music, tons of awesome people, great workshops and talks with amazing artists and a lot of drawing, painting, learning and fooling around.
I had the chance to meet some amazing artists and idols of mine, such as Amadeus WaltenspülPeter Boehme and Claus Daniel Hermann, just to name a few.

These are some of the sketches I did during or right before the convention.

-click here for more drawings i did during the event-

~Raman

ramandjafari:

Sketchwizzlecon Sketch Wizzles No.1

Heeyoo errrbody,
I’m back from the SketchWizzleCon 2014 in Wuppertal. Those last four days have been an absolute blast! A great location, good music, tons of awesome people, great workshops and talks with amazing artists and a lot of drawing, painting, learning and fooling around.
I had the chance to meet some amazing artists and idols of mine, such as Amadeus WaltenspülPeter Boehme and Claus Daniel Hermann, just to name a few.

These are some of the sketches I did during or right before the convention.

-click here for more drawings i did during the event-

~Raman

lifeunderthewaves:

Paradise Revisited
A return to the reefs of Kimbe Bay

1. A threespot damselfish swims near a trio of pink anemonefish in Papua New Guinea’s Kimbe Bay.

2. Its flippers spread like wings, a hawksbill sea turtle flies past batfish and barracuda. Submerged peaks attract many species from the open ocean and make Kimbe Bay a haven of biodiversity.

3. Animals that look like plants, feather stars sweep plankton from Kimbe’s waters. With 900 species of reef fish, the bay literally pulses with life—a movable feast for predators like these barracuda.

4. Volcanoes shrouded in rain forest slope to the bay, here punctuated by tiny Tuare and Kapepa Islands. According to the Nature Conservancy, Kimbe’s wide variety of marine habitats—coral reefs, mangroves, seagrasses, deep ocean waters, and submerged mountains—make it a global conservation priority.

5. Amid the folds of their host anemone, a pink anemonefish fans the eggs his mate has laid, keeping the nest free of sediment. Anemonefish are hermaphroditic, possessing both male and female tissue. Some develop functioning sex organs to reproduce.

6. Cupped in the safety of an anemone, an anemonefish peers up at the vast bay beyond its home. A protective layer of slime lets these fish thrive where others dare not swim—anemones’ tentacles produce a paralyzing venom.

7. A garden of delicate coral is sheltered from storms in the lee of a nearby peninsula. Kimbe’s reefs help sustain local fishermen, some of whom still rely on traditional outrigger canoes.

8. A 60-foot-tall tower of barracuda rises past photographer Doubilet’s wife and collaborator, marine biologist Jennifer Hayes. Many of Kimbe’s coral pinnacles host a resident school of barracuda—a sign of a robust reef.

9. The bignose unicornfish may lack a horn, but two bony plates on its tail can cut predators.

10. Among the reefs’ tiniest residents is the pagurid hermit crab, which lives in coral burrows made by tube worms and nabs plankton with its antennae.

All photographs by David Doubilet.

Taken from National Geographic.

griseus:

PORCELAIN CRABS FROM CHILE

Porcelanids are decapod (with 10 legs) crustaceans in the widespread family Porcellanidae, which superficially resemble true crabs. They have flattened bodies as an adaptation for living in rock crevices. They are delicate, readily losing limbs when attacked, and use their large claws for maintaining territories.

Photograph by Arthur Anker

  • Allopetrolisthes spinifrons
  • Allopetrolisthes angulosus
  • Petrolisthes laevigatus
  • Lipetrolisthes mitra
  • Alopetrolisthes punctatus
  • Petrolisthes violaceus
  • Petrolisthes tuberculatus